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selling on ebay - Two to Tango - EBay Buyer/Seller Disagreements

by Chris Malta

Even the most honest, well-meaning eBayers sometimes find themselves locked in unfortunate and unnecessary disputes, usually due to a simple misunderstanding. Colin Rule, eBay's Dispute Resolution specialist, believes many of these disputes could be avoided if retailers communicated more effectively from the beginning.

Taking the Right Approach:
Your sales terms play an important role in deflecting miscommunications. Explains Rule, "Sales terms are your opportunity to address all the issues that might later emerge into a dispute. If you put the right terms in, you can stop that first domino from falling over and avoid all the headaches that come afterward."

There are several things you need to keep in mind when drafting sales terms:
  • They should be clear and easy-to-understand. Plainly lay out your policies regarding returns and refunds. How much time does the buyer have to return an item? Who pays the return shipping and handling? What are the restocking fees? You want to make sure your buyers' expectations for how things will be handled are in line with your own.

  • Take a positive tone. Don't be overly aggressive and scare potential buyers away. The way you phrase things can make a big difference in how customers perceive you. For example, instead of saying "We do not accept Discover", try stating "We are happy to accept Visa, MasterCard, and American Express".
Resolving Disputes
It's equally important to keep that positive attitude if an issue does arise. Advises Rule, "Set a constructive tone. The tone that happens when the problem first emerges has everything to do with how that resolution process is going to pan out." Don't throw blame on the other party, or get defensive.

Be proactive - express your desire to work together to figure out what happened and find a solution that's mutually satisfying.

Whenever possible, try and be flexible when a buyer wants to return an item. You're investing in your buyer relations and in your reputation for customer service. That doesn't mean, however, that you're obligated to let a customer run over you. Sometimes, you have to draw a line and stick to your policies.

The important thing is to always communicate. Up front, it will save you a lot of confusion and run-ins. And on the back end, it will help you work things out with your customers so that you can both leave the transaction happy.

 
Archive List

ARTICLE ARCHIVE LIST

 

Dealing with Backorders

When Your Customers Steal

WorldwideBrands.com Article abou...

Mass Emails to Distributors Shou...

4 Rules for New Entrepreneurs - ...

Take Charge of Your Time, Take C...

Two to Tango - EBay Buyer/Seller...

Virtual Staffing for Your Small ...

Software Designed Around Your Ne...

Beating the Odds - 3 Ways to Ens...

Good Business Sense - Microsoft'...

Is Fulfillment Right for My E-Bi...